Arts and Culture

Paula Halperin

In one of the countless revealing scenes of Lucrecia Martel’s fourth film, Don Diego de Zama (a brilliant Daniel Giménez Cacho), the Spanish corregidor stuck in a northeast province in the Rio de la Plata Viceroyalty around the end of the 18th century, finds a group of female Guaraní Indians and their children. A two or three-year-old boy screams ferociously and crawls in circles, like a little lost animal. Don Diego approaches the young woman, who seems to be the boy’s mother, and asks, is he my son? She barely looks at him and nods.   

Omar Baig
Forrest Muelrath

Aria Chiodo

Vishwas R. Gaitonde
Cristina Nualart

Vishwas R. Gaitonde

Shaun RandolYahia Lababidi

In this edition of The Mantle's podcast (available on Soundcloud), Shaun Randol speaks with Egyptian-American writer Yahia Lababidi on the occasion of the publication of his sixth book, Balancing Acts: New and Select Poems: 1993 - 2015 (Press53).

Dewaine Farria

Shaun Randol

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