Arts and Culture

Dewaine Farria

In discussions of the steroid-fueled action star pantheon of the 1980s, the heroes of the two movies I grew up revering most—Action Jackson and The Last Dragon—tend to get left out. Neither wore capes, but for me—an 11-year Marvel Comics aficionado more interested in nailing kick-flips than three-pointers—both Detective Sergeant Jericho “Action” Jackson and “Bruce” Leroy Green were superheroes.

Cristina Nualart

Editor's Note: This piece has been translated from the Spanish by the author. It was originally published in DIDDCC for Centro de Arte 2 de Mayo. 

 

Ben Gazur

Is a song still a song if no one hears it? I’m not talking about the thousands of tracks on Spotify which have never been listened to, but about those songs which have offended someone with the power to ban them. Censorship is always about weakness – silencing someone tells the world that you are terrified of what they have to say. Moddi, a Norwegian folk singer, is doing his part in getting these powerful, silenced, songs back out to the world by re-recording them.

Aria Chiodo

Paula Halperin

In one of the countless revealing scenes of Lucrecia Martel’s fourth film, Don Diego de Zama (a brilliant Daniel Giménez Cacho), the Spanish corregidor stuck in a northeast province in the Rio de la Plata Viceroyalty around the end of the 18th century, finds a group of female Guaraní Indians and their children. A two or three-year-old boy screams ferociously and crawls in circles, like a little lost animal. Don Diego approaches the young woman, who seems to be the boy’s mother, and asks, is he my son? She barely looks at him and nods.   

Omar Baig
Forrest Muelrath

Aria Chiodo

Vishwas R. Gaitonde
Cristina Nualart

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