Arts and Culture

Laura Scheriau

The Mexican artist Salvador Diaz has gained international recognition with his three series: “Album de Familia,” “Diarios de Viaje y Desplazamiento,” and “Periodicos.” The world that he creates through this intelligent use of words and pictures is full of messages, some quite subtle and some very obvious, but more importantly, all true to his belief that art captures time.

Laura Scheriau

Over the past couple of years there has been an increased fascination with Disney characters–especially the princesses. This is partially due to the spate of releases that put heroines (princesses, not princes) front and center, including Brave and Frozen. The ladies are gaining interest thanks to some serious makeovers, from goth to hipster, pin-up to zombie, renaissance to urban. The results are most welcome.

Michael J. Jordan

Mallory Nezam

There is a quote commonly used within The Movement (as we call it) that reads, “They wanted to bury us.

Laura Scheriau

In this inaugural edition of The Beat, a series of interviews with musicians, I speak with Matt Wong, a 17-year-old virtuoso guitar player and teacher from New Jersey.

To get a sense of his character and musical tastes, I asked Matt to open his digital music library, shuffle the tunes, and tell me the first three songs that appear. The results:  “Jean Pierre” by Miles Davis, “What You Want,” from the musical Legally Blonde, and Handel’s “Hallelujah Chorus.”

And on that note...

Marti Trgovich
Ariell Cacciola

World Literature Editor Ariell Cacciola speaks with German playwright Juliane Stadelmann,1 whose new play “Noch ein Lied vom Tod” is being staged at Schauspielhaus Wien in Austria.

William Pennington

Emmanuel Iduma

Arie Amaya-Akkermans

[Acrylic on board, 38.5x76 cm, 2013]

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