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Paula Halperin

In one of the countless revealing scenes of Lucrecia Martel’s fourth film, Don Diego de Zama (a brilliant Daniel Giménez Cacho), the Spanish corregidor stuck in a northeast province in the Rio de la Plata Viceroyalty around the end of the 18th century, finds a group of female Guaraní Indians and their children. A two or three-year-old boy screams ferociously and crawls in circles, like a little lost animal. Don Diego approaches the young woman, who seems to be the boy’s mother, and asks, is he my son? She barely looks at him and nods.   

Ben Gazur

Ikigai: The Japanese Secret to a Long and Happy Life
by Hector Garcia and Fransesc Miralles
Hutchinson (2017), 208 pages

The Little Book of Ikigai: The Essential Japanese Way to Finding Your Purpose in Life
by Ken Mogi
Quercus (2017), 208 pages
 

Hilary Scheppers

Oxygen
by Julia Fiedorczuk
Translated from the Polish by Bill Johnston
Zephyr Press (2017), 134 pages Polish & English

 

Katherine Cintron

Editor's Note: Akpa Arinzechukwu is a Nigerian poet whose writing deals with the complicated intersection of sexuality, religion, and culture in Nigeria. He is currently living in Abia state, in the midst of the violence from the Biafran separatist movement. He recently sat down with Katherine Cintron, a student from Deltona High School, to talk about writing, music, and his project City Dwellers.

 

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Rutvi Ajmera

Amarnath Amarasingam Jacob Davey

André GagnéMarc-André Argentino

On Wednesday June 21, the great 12th Century al-Nuri mosque in Mosul was destroyed. It was in this religious space that Abū Bakr al-Baghdadi made his first public appearance as caliph during the Friday prayers on July 4, 2014, one month after ISIS’ occupation of Mosul, and a few days following the announcement of the Caliphate by Abū Muhammad al-Adnānī. The question that is now on many people’s minds is: who really destroyed the al-Nuri mosque?

Forrest Muelrath

Peter Heft

Translated from Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari A Thousand Plateaus, trans. Brian Massumi, 3-25.

Silke Melbye-Hansen

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