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Emmanuel Iduma

Arie Amaya-Akkermans

[Husain Tarabie]

Arie Amaya-Akkermans

[Kamrooz Aram at Green Art] 

Corrie Hulse

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry

The funny thing about moving back home after living abroad for years is that nothing ever feels quite the same. What was once home now feels foreign. Your old haunts and old friends are now strangely unfamiliar; leaving you wondering if the home you remember is simply an elaborate story you dreamt up over the years. In grasping for the familiar, you find yourself questioning what you once took for granted and hoping to discover how exactly it all changed while you were gone.

Joanna Scutts

Erich Maria Remarque

The following commentary was presented at the “Writing War” panel discussion on May 1, as part of the PEN World Voices Festival of International Literature.

Chris Haddix

Shaun Randol

Still from the movie version of All Quiet on the Western Front (1930)

The discussion of anti-war literature demands several questions, none of which will be addressed here. For example, should there even be anti-war literature? What is war, exactly, and so then what is anti-war? Which wars are worth opposing and is it the obligation of the writer to do so? And so on. Never mind that no two wars are alike, so then no two artistic responses are alike. In war, like in art, there is no single truth.

Chris Haddix

The death of theory, not unlike the end of history, has, in the second decade of the twenty-first century, been exposed as an embarrassingly premature announcement.

Shaun Randol

Rue de Paris, Temps de Pluie (1877) by Gustave Caillebotte

[Read part one of this dispatch here.]

I had intended on discovering the literary scene in the Caribbean with only a slight side trip for the briefest of philosophy discussions, but the best laid plans of mice and men oft go astray when one encounters Frédéric Gros.

Shaun Randol

I found myself on a windy and rainy evening at the Westbeth Center for the Arts, a massive warren of beautiful apartments crammed full of writers, dancers, visual artists, actors, poets, and other artistic folks. For what the PEN World Voices Festival deemed a Literary Safari, several of these creative-types opened their apartments and hosted visiting writers in mini-salons, where the scribes read for fifteen minutes and answered questions for another fifteen, and then whoosh!

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