Censorship

M.C. Armstrong

The Art of Revolt
by Geoffroy de Lagasnerie
Stanford University Press (2017), 128 pages

 

Ben Gazur

Is a song still a song if no one hears it? I’m not talking about the thousands of tracks on Spotify which have never been listened to, but about those songs which have offended someone with the power to ban them. Censorship is always about weakness – silencing someone tells the world that you are terrified of what they have to say. Moddi, a Norwegian folk singer, is doing his part in getting these powerful, silenced, songs back out to the world by re-recording them.

Emma Diltz

Emma Diltz

Lorenzo Dávalos
Lorenzo Dávalos

In this two-part essay, public policy expert Lorenzo Dávalos delves into the complicated relationship between media and government in Venezuela. This first installment digs into Chavez and later Maduro's campaign against independent and critical media, aiming to demonize dissenting voices in the country. Part two moves further into the grounding of this campaign and its direction toward a media hegemony in the country.

 

Orlando Luis Pardo Lazo
Ariell Cacciola

This article is part of The Mantle's series Against Censorship.

 

An Iranian Metamorphosis 
by Mana Neyestani
Translated from the Persian by Ghazal Mosadeq
Uncivilized Books (2014), 208 pp

Luis Perez Garcia

Shaun Randol

Paul Berman reads at PEN World Voices Festival's opening night as Salman Rushdie and Judith Butler look on (© Beowulf Sheehan/PEN American Center)

[Read part one of this dispatch.]

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