Democracy

Kayhan Irani

There is a very simple exercise that we do in the Theater of the Oppressed to demonstrate the essence of a conflict: two people stand face to face; one person says, “I want it” and the other person replies “You can’t have it.” They repeat these, and only these, phrases to one another—each person trying to get the other to concede to her will by modulating her voice, moving her body, etc. The battle of wills, one desire against another, is a simple way to define conflict. In the real world conflict is layered with complexity.

Ed Hancox

In the space of a week, Nadezhda Tolokonnikova, Yekaterina Samutsevich, and Maria Alyokhina have arguably become the world's most famous political prisoners following their sentencing in a Moscow courtroom last Friday.

World Policy Journal

 

by Natasha Yarotskaya

Russia by mind comprehended cannot be

Nor by wide arshins measured:

Its uniqueness be that—

In Russia is possible only but to believe.

(Tiutchev, I. 28 November, 1866, translation by Fr. S. Janos)

 

Corrie Hulse

Emily Cody

Sudan’s most recent spate of demonstrations that began on 16 June at the University of Khartoum and have since spread across the country have been a long time coming. Similar student demonstrations began in late January 2011 and were revived in January 2012. Both were met with strong crackdowns by police and the National Intelligence and Security Services (NISS).

World Policy Journal

 

Photo: Shutterstock

by Maria Brock and Natasha Yarotskaya

Michael J. Jordan

MASERU, Lesotho – Last week was one filled with nostalgia and melancholy.

Ed Hancox

Earlier this week, the team from Zambia won the Africa Cup of Nations soccer tournament.  The Zambian side, known as the Chipolopolo, or Copper Bullets, were an underdog in the 16 team field.  Their victory over the heavily-favored Cote d'Ivoire side was a thrilling enough outcome, but that it happened in Libreville, Gabon, where a generation earlier Zambia's entire national team had been wiped out in an airplane crash proved to be nothing short of a national catharsis.

Ahmet Sibdial SauShaun Randol

During the three month occupation of Zuccotti Park by Occupy Wall Street protesters last year, cameras were everywhere. News agencies, police, and demonstrators trained their cameras (high end and low tech) on each other for around the clock surveillance. And all of this streamed live on the Internet. In this collaborative essay, Shaun Randol discusses this all-seeing phenomenon side-by-side Ahmet Sibdial Sau's photographs of the occupation.

Shaun Randol

In 458 B.C.E., Lucius Quinctius Cincinnatus—at the request of high ranking officials—came out of retirement to rule as Roman dictator. The Aequians, who lived in the central Appennines of Italy, were fighting for their independence from Rome. The capital was in danger of losing control.

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