Democracy

World Policy Journal

by Pauline Moullot and Valentine Pasquesoone

Shaun Randol

Like many of you, I have been following the Occupy Wall Street movement since its inception, which is now entering its fourth week. My initial reaction on hearing of the occupation was one of caution; I assumed—and I am sure I am not alone—that this was another case of young, white, privileged college students staging a demonstration out of genuine concern, but able to do so because they knew Mom and Dad would keep putting money into their checking accounts.

Shaun Randol

Though media and public interest in the organization has waned recently, WikiLeaks continues to publish a torrent of diplomatic and other sensitive material. In this essay, Shaun Randol argues that, from top to bottom, the anti-secrecy organization has permanently altered how international affairs are conducted: emboldened citizens worldwide can now act in arenas normally reserved for a powerful, elite few.

World Policy Journal

by Harry W.S. Lee. Originally published by our partner site, World Policy Blog.

In a prison-issued white sarong, the artist enters, blinded by a black bag over her head, stumbling her way on tiptoes, her legs trembling from hunger and fear. On the floor, she struggles to devour rice and the water through the black bag, venting out heavy gasps, punctuating with groans—a disturbing sight almost too private to be public.

Emily Cody

 

Chris Eberhardt (汪哲伟)

BEIJING “你们会说英语吗?“(Can you all speak English?) Kevin S. Osborne, a recent graduate from Seattle University asked before joining his partner in talking about efforts to forge Sino-US partnerships to address climate change (in English). The Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) club was holding one of its regular educational meetings for its members on a Friday night in a Beijing University classroom.

World Policy Journal

by Frank Spring. Originally published by our partner site, World Policy Blog.

World Policy Journal

by Shibani Mahtani. Originally published by our partner site, World Policy Blog.

World Policy Journal

by Belinda Cooper. Originally published by our partner site, World Policy Blog.

Omar Fotihi

First Tunisia, then Egypt, and now ... Yemen? Unrest is increasing across the Middle East and North Africa, and young people are leading the way. Demonstrators are calling for democratic change, social justice, and economic improvements. In this essay, Yemeni Omar Fotihi explains his frustrations with his home-country, and tells us of his hopes and dreams for a new Yemen.

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