Music

Shaun Randol

The "Faith and Science" event was so popular that World Science Festival had to move it to a larger venue. NYU’s Kimmel Center played host to a provocative discussion on the relationship between faith and science, two seemingly intractable opposites. Or, are they actually two sides of the same coin? While much of New York City melted in balmy weather, the esteemed panelists on stage were cool in the assessments of their own passions and crafts.

Corinne Goldenberg

Hamid Reza Sadr, in his book, Iranian cinema: a political history, describes the trend of Iranian film as representing society beneath a veiled subtext: “Behind a tale of happy childhood, for example, may lurk a subtext about disheartened

Matthew Young

Out on an ill-advised shopping trip to Georgetown one sweltering August afternoon some years ago, the two of us rounded the corner from Pennsylvania Ave. to M Street. In our path a junkie lay shirtless and spread-eagle, a pitted dark briquette smoldering on the new brick sidewalk. A factoid bubbles up as the sweat beads down: “Gil Scott-Heron’s playing at Blues Alley this week” just a few wavy-lined blocks away.

Matthew Young

Springtime’s burst of energy is always refreshing, but the churning unpredictability of recent weather (via climate change) saps some of the excitement about rising temperatures. As dead zones balloon in the oceans, the UN is grasping for direction and memories of the Copenhagen Summit now linger like the stench of thawing permafrost.

William Harvey

Language, cultural biases, fear and other elements of society can become barriers to communication and problem solving. But one thing remains certain: across borders, be it political or cultural, music is universal. Here, William Harvey shares experiences of using music to build trust between cultures. In the process, his organization, Cultures in Harmony, lays one more stepping stone in the greater path to peace.

Matthew Young

  

Matthew Young

 

I’ll lay you even money that Denzel Washington and Gary Oldman are so bad they could survive the Apocalypse. If we’re both still around to settle the wager, it’s really win-win regardless. These two alpha dogs bark and bite over “Mankind’s Last Hope” in the Hughes brothers’ wasteland Western The Book of Eli. Heads will roll to the sound of Atticus Ross’s electronic/organic 80 piece big band. The future is Friday and here’s what it sounds like.

Matthew Young

Jazz music has nothing in common with the grey spruce lying unwanted on the Bleecker Street sidewalk, its shreds of tinsel swaying upwards with cold winter gusts. The NYC Winter Jazzfest’s Saturday venues are, in fact, hot houses for a verdant field of talent. Rumors of jazz’s demise are greatly exaggerated with so many genre-bending improvisers sprouting up these days. For a little green ($25 for one night, $30 for two), a crush of 2,500 cultivated souls reaped the benefits of one of the year’s best fests.

Matthew Young

So this is the Horn of Plenty. It’s the first night of the NYC Winter Jazzfest and one thing’s for certain: I can’t write in the dark. In its sixth year, the festival features a line-up of fifty smartly selected bands performing at five venues in the West Village. 

Shaun Randol

2010 Winter Jazzfest (now in its sixth year) began promptly (Le) Poisson Rouge with Darcy James Argue’s Secret Society, an 18-member ensemble (by my count) directed by the eponymous leader. Argue’s direction was precise, if not robotic, but the band sounded confident and emphatic.

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