Review

Katharine Coldiron

The Witch Elm
by Tana French
Penguin Random House (2018), 528 pages

 

Aria Chiodo

Katharine Coldiron

The Strange Case of Dr. Couney: How a Mysterious European Showman Saved Thousands of American Babies
by Dawn Raffel
Blue Rider Press (2018), 304 pages

 

Dewaine Farria

Omar Baig

The Smithsonian’s Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden concluded their recent exhibit, Brand New: Art and Commodity in the 1980s (Feb 14–May 13, 2018), with a gala in honor of Jeff Koons.

Peter Heft

Xenofeminism
by Helen Hester
Polity Press (2018), 140 pages 

 

M.C. Armstrong

Zero K
by Don DeLillo
Simon & Schuster Trade (2017), 288 pages 

 

M.C. Armstrong

The Art of Revolt
by Geoffroy de Lagasnerie
Stanford University Press (2017), 128 pages

 

Paula Halperin

In one of the countless revealing scenes of Lucrecia Martel’s fourth film, Don Diego de Zama (a brilliant Daniel Giménez Cacho), the Spanish corregidor stuck in a northeast province in the Rio de la Plata Viceroyalty around the end of the 18th century, finds a group of female Guaraní Indians and their children. A two or three-year-old boy screams ferociously and crawls in circles, like a little lost animal. Don Diego approaches the young woman, who seems to be the boy’s mother, and asks, is he my son? She barely looks at him and nods.   

Bridey Heing

There are moments in Stephen Moles’ The Most Wretched Thing Imaginable: Or Beneath the Burnt Umbrella where you can begin to see it coming together. A sequence of paragraphs begin to flow in a logical order that you can follow, or a name repeats enough times that it sticks in your mind, or a theme recurs in a way that suggests a plot. But those moments are few and far between, and most of the book is little more than nonsense.

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