Review

Bridey Heing

There are moments in Stephen Moles’ The Most Wretched Thing Imaginable: Or Beneath the Burnt Umbrella where you can begin to see it coming together. A sequence of paragraphs begin to flow in a logical order that you can follow, or a name repeats enough times that it sticks in your mind, or a theme recurs in a way that suggests a plot. But those moments are few and far between, and most of the book is little more than nonsense.

Eric Anthamatten

Chancers: One Couple's Memoir
by Graham MacIndoe and Susan Stellin
Ballantine (2016), 448 pages

Chance. Luck. Choice. We take chances. We have luck. We make choices.

As a photographer, Graham MacIndoe chose—subjects, frames, aperture settings, negatives to be printed.

As a writer, Susan Stellin chose—subjects, sentences, adjectives, edits to be published.

They both took chances with their creations, their careers, and each other.

Corrie Hulse

A Journey to the Dark Heart of Nameless Unspeakable Evil
by Jane Bussman
Nortia Press (2014), 328 pages

 

Benjamin Dean

Shadow Government: Surveillance, Secret Wars, and a Global Security State in a Single Superpower World
by Tom Engelhardt
Haymarket Books (2014), 174 pages

 

Dewaine Farria

Vishwas R. Gaitonde
Dami Ajayi

Fela: Kalakuta Notes (Second Edition)
by John Collins
Wesleyan University Press (2015), 326 pages

 

Simone Wolff

Dreadful: The Short Life and Gay Times of John Horne Burns
by David Margolick
Other Press (2013), 320 pages

 

Bridey Heing

The Elusive Moth
by Ingrid Winterbach
Translated from the Afrikaans by Iris Gouws and the author
Open Letter Books (2014), 198 pages

 

Ariell Cacciola

Blood Brothers
by Ernst Haffner
Translated from the German by Michael Hofmann
Other Press (2015), 165 pages

 

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