Writing

Phil Hanrahan

Writer’s Notes is a series that invites writers to detail their projects at any stage in their process. In this third installment by author Phil Hanrahan, he discusses his research trip and continuing work on a book about the Burren College of Art in western Ireland’s singular Burren region. The book is currently titled Moonlight in County Clare.

Jessica Pishko

Writer's Notes is a series that invites writers to detail their projects at any stage in their process. Writer Jessica Pishko parses her memories as a first year law student and of the summer she worked on a death penalty case in North Carolina for her debut novel A Trial for Grace.

*

Shaun Randol

Betsy Robinson

“I’m sorry, but I don’t feel strongly enough about your mother’s book to do a blurb for it,” writes my author friend.

Corrie Hulse

A lucky few writers, who get so much publicity that they can take it or leave it, have made second careers of trashing the medium and any writer who uses it. This speech is for the rest of us.

Tim Fredrick

Writer's Notes is a series that invites writers to detail their projects at any stage in their process. Author Tim Fredrick discusses his short story collection We Regret to Inform You, and his approach to writing and collecting his own personal stories.

 

Phil Hanrahan

Writer’s Notes is a series that invites writers to detail their projects at any stage in their process. In this second installment by author Phil Hanrahan, he discusses his research trips and work on a book about the Burren College of Art in western Ireland’s singular Burren region. The book is currently titled Moonlight in County Clare. You can read Phil’s first installment here.

***

William Pennington

M.C. Armstrong

The writer M.C. Armstrong was embedded with U.S. soldiers in Iraq when a military contractor divulged a secret about Saddam Hussein's weapons of mass destruction. Questions arose: Was he credible? Did U.S. authorities know about the buried armaments? Would the public even care? And what's a writer to do with the juicy information?

Ariell Cacciola

One of Germany's most puzzling (and grisly) crimes remains unsolved almost 100 years after it was committed. A family of five plus their live-in maid are hacked to death at a rural farm; the killer is never found. The heinous act is the focus of Andrea Mara Schenkel's most recent book, The Murder Farm. Ariell Cacciola had a chance to discuss the unnerving novel with Schenkel and what unexpected fame has brought the author. 

Pages