Writing

Sarah Ulicny

Writer's Notes is a series that invites writers to detail their projects at any stage in their process. Writer Sarah Ulicny talks about how fundraising contributed to the evolution of her tentatively titled novel, Alice Merkel v. Helen Keller.

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James Tate Hill

Writer's Notes is a series that invites writers to detail their projects at any stage in their process. Debut author James Tate Hill explores his West Virginia roots and how place has influenced his past writing as well as his current novel.

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Nina Zumel

Topping 700 pages, A Thousand Forests in One Acorn is a doorstop of an anthology with something for everyone. Showcasing 28 writers from Argentina to Honduras to Spain, the anthology is a veritable smorgasbord of literary talent. Nina Zumel reviews this multidimensional collection, which contains the expected (like magical realism) and several surprises, including Faulkner's ghost.

Ariell Cacciola

Writer's Notes is a series that invites writers to detail their projects at any stage in their process. The Mantle and its readers are curious to know more about the process of organizing a particular project for any author whether they be a fiction or non-fiction writer, poet, essayist, or anything in between or beyond.

Téa Rokolj

Nearly two decades have passed since factions in Bosnia and Herzegovina put down their arms, and yet the embers of conflict between ethnic groups still burn. "What I do know, what is clear, is that in Bosnia and Herzegovina extremely bad people are in power," observes the writer Alma Lazarevska. In this penetrating, bilingual interview by Téa Rokolj, Lazarevska expounds on literature, inspiration, and life in post-war Sarajevo. [Bosanski/Hrvatski/Srpski jezik]

Phil Hanrahan

Writer's Notes is a series that invites writers to detail their projects at any stage in their process. In the inaugural post, author Phil Hanrahan examines the provenance and initial research for his tentatively titled book, A Couple, A Castle, A Dream, which takes him to Ballyvaughan, Ireland and the Burren College of Art.

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Emmanuel Iduma

Joanna Scutts

Shaun Randol

During the 1920s and 1930s, Stefan Zweig was the most widely read and translated writer in the world. More than that, he was a facilitator, connecting a veritable who's who of high culture in Vienna and Europe at large. A fierce advocate of individual expression and humanism, Zweig was a cultural force. And yet, he surrendered to the disconnectedness brought on by forced exile, committing suicide alongside his second wife. What can we learn from his rise and fall?

Emmanuel Iduma

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