Writing

Emmanuel Iduma

Shaun Randol

A recent survey reveals that NSA surveillance in the United States is having a stifling effect on many journalists and nonfiction and fiction writers. Out of concern they're being watched, writers are passing on public events, redirecting research, and muting some communications. Perhaps worst of all, self-censorship is becoming apparent. Learn more in this exclusive interview with Suzanne Nossel, the Executive Director PEN American Center.

Shaun Randol

Poet, visionary, historian, chronicler of the forgotten, scorned, and oppressed. Eduardo Galeano held court to a packed auditorium at a PEN World Voices Festival of International Literature conversation held at The New School. The event was facilitated by Jessica Hagedorn.

Shaun Randol

In my travels around the global literary scene, the question of a writerly identity has never seemed more precarious, conflicted, and urgent than with writers from Africa. More often than not, it is the writer—not the reader—who is fixated on the question: who or what is an African writer?

J. K. Fowler

Friday, May 03, 2013, 8:30pm The New School: Tishman Auditorium 66 West 12th St., New York, NY 10011

Caustically witty and sharp-tongued as ever, Fran Lebowitz and A.M. Homes lit up the stage at The New School's Tishman auditorium last night with a candid conversation that ranged in disparate topics from bravery in writing to changes in New York City and in particular, the West Village, to revenge, playing a judge on TV, to teaching, politics and Hurricane Sandy.

J. K. Fowler

Thursday, May 02, 2013, 6:30pm The New School: Tishman Auditorium 66 West 12th St., New York, NY 10011

J. K. Fowler

Tuesday, April 30, 2013, 1:00pm The Library at The Public Theater 425 Lafayette Street, New York, NY 10003

Emmanuel Iduma

‘An elemental narrative’ is the description we should use for a story that transcends genre. Our understanding of ‘elemental’ relates to what is ‘essential’ or ‘a basic part.’ It means that our elemental narratives always bear the premise that we are writing a ‘basic’ story that touches at the heart of who we are and what we have become. The goal of the writer will be to write a story that is as elemental as a shared humanity, those recognizable qualities that makes us human, and sometimes inhuman.

Emmanuel Iduma

What does it mean to be an African writer? And why is this question still being asked? The world may know the literary giants Chinua Achebe, Ngũgĩ wa Thiong'o, and Wole Soyinka, but their work does not stand for an entire continent. In this fragmented essay, Emmanuel Iduma muses on the intersection of modernity and the writerly experience, and the great writing sure to emerge from that complex nexus.

Emmanuel Iduma

I will argue for a new Nigerian literary order.

Suppose we call this ‘neo-literariness’, for want of a better word, and because in hyphenation a word acquires two identities. So, neo-literariness is the word to use for a generation of writers and enthusiasts who function despite institutional lapses, and whose artistic engagement thrives of new ways of being, especially web-technology.

I will explain with a few examples.

Pages