Cæmeron Crain

Cæmeron Crain is pursuing his PhD in Philosophy at the New School for Social Research, and teaches as an adjunct lecturer in New York City. He earned his M.A. in Philosophy, as well as a B.A. in Communications, from Kent State University in Kent, Ohio.

Contributions

April 1, 2014

The Mantle is pleased to present the fourth in a series of important blog posts by Cæmeron Crain addressing critical concepts in contemporary political philosophy. Cæmeron's previous post explored the contours of life in what the philosopher Gilles Deleuze called a "Society of Control." In what follows, Cæmeron begins the difficult process of articulating a practice of resistance to the "diffuse matrix" of late-capitalist power. 

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September 2, 2013

On August 18th, philosopher and Mantle contributor Cæmeron Crain appeared live on "Inside the Sulphurbath" for an engaging discussion of "Living in a Society of Control," his latest in a series of blog posts addressing key concepts in contemporary political theory. 

July 30, 2013

The Mantle proudly presents the third in a series of important blog posts by Cæmeron Crain exploring critical concepts in contemporary political philosophy.

July 22, 2013

The Mantle is pleased to present the second in series of blog posts by Cæmeron Crain exploring key concepts in contemporary political philosophy. In his previous post, Microfascism, Cæmeron introduced us to the concept of desire, and the work it does in Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari's Capitalism and Schizophrenia. Here, Cæmeron picks up where he left off, following the analysis of desire from microfascism to Territory

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June 5, 2013

The Mantle is excited to present the first in series of blog posts by Cæmeron Crain exploring key concepts in contemporary political philosophy, beginning with the work of the seminal French theorists, Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari. 

May 17, 2011

In 2008, writer-philosopher David Foster Wallace took his own life. In his wake, he left the makings of a second epic novel. The pile of notes and chapters (finished and unfinished) were published as The Pale King. The writer Sandro Veronesi likened reading this novel to glimpsing the foot of a "huge statue, of an immense monument to boredom." Cæmeron Crain reviews the enigmatic author and his last novel.