International Affairs

Rutvi Ajmera

Joan Cocks

While “border” is the specific concept of a delineating, separating, and adjacency-creating edge, there’s a fundamental sense in which every concept has edges that help distinguish it from every other. Some of those other concepts will be similar to it but not identical, most will be incommensurable, and a few will be diametrically opposed. Thus, the concept of border is similar but not identical to “periphery” and “margin,” incommensurable with “forest” or “justice” or “appetite,” and diametrically opposed to “the center” on the one side and “unboundedness” on the other. Linguistic distinctions, in short, are made by drawing conceptual and hence mental dividing lines between x and y that also relate the entities they distinguish in different ways.

Michael Forman

The train that crosses the Oresund from Copenhagen to Malmö was nearly at its destination. As it pulled into the first stop, the doors stayed closed; gendarmes boarded and proceeded to check documents. For locals, used to a half-hour ride, the commute has more than doubled in duration. For the unfortunates pulled off the train, the ordeal would continue. The checks, new and broadly unpopular in Malmö, respond to the hostile reaction against refugees from Swedes who live far from the area. Both Denmark and Sweden are parties to the Schengen Agreement (1985) which allows for the free movement of their citizens as if they were in a single country. There are no checks on the way to Copenhagen.

Élisabeth Vallet

After the fall of the Berlin Wall it was believed that the reconfiguration of international relations was opening an age of globalization in which states, borders, and sovereignties would become obsolete. September 11, however, signaled the end of this Western-centered utopia and the beginning of an era where border barriers and walls were becoming central to a re-fortified world. Borders were seen as open, soft, and purposely porous. They have become more and more closed, hard, and seemingly impassable. 

Amarnath Amarasingam Jacob Davey

André GagnéMarc-André Argentino

On Wednesday June 21, the great 12th Century al-Nuri mosque in Mosul was destroyed. It was in this religious space that Abū Bakr al-Baghdadi made his first public appearance as caliph during the Friday prayers on July 4, 2014, one month after ISIS’ occupation of Mosul, and a few days following the announcement of the Caliphate by Abū Muhammad al-Adnānī. The question that is now on many people’s minds is: who really destroyed the al-Nuri mosque?

Silke Melbye-Hansen

Corrie Hulse
Max Regus
Silke Melbye-Hansen

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