International Affairs

Michael J. Jordan

PHOTO ESSAY: On August 30th, an “attempted coup” in Lesotho plunged the country into crisis. Now in its third week, it’s a full-blown diplomatic challenge for all of southern Africa. Recently South African President Jacob Zuma flew to the tiny "Kingdom in the Sky" to mediate. Michael J. Jordan, who covered the meeting for AFP, presents a photo essay on underlying political intrigue of a country on the brink.

Chris Wilson

With the most recent ceasefire still standing, for Israel and Hamas a return to violence is never out of the question. As the world waits to see if this new peace holds, writer Chris Wilson takes a moment to look at the warring parties, the issues at hand, and the civilians caught in the middle.

Michael J. Jordan

This year marks the 20th anniversary since South Africa's first democratic elections, which in 1994 drove the final nail into the coffin of Apartheid. To commemorate this event and measure the depth of racial healing between blacks and whites in "The New South Africa," longtime Mantle correspondent Michael J. Jordan launched a documentary-film project, The Clubhouse: A Post-Apartheid Story.

Michael J. Jordan

Tucked in the middle of South Africa, the small country of Lesotho has made great strides in recent years by strengthening its democracy and moving toward stability. Yet, it could all be for naught if the country continues to refuse to address the real crisis in the region: HIV.

Corrie Hulse

Margaret Benison

Lebanese Prime Minister Tammam Salam (center) casts his vote to elect the new Lebanese president in the parliament building in downtown Beirut on April 23, 2014. (Photo: AFP-Joseph Eid)

Corrie Hulse

 

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry

The funny thing about moving back home after living abroad for years is that nothing ever feels quite the same. What was once home now feels foreign. Your old haunts and old friends are now strangely unfamiliar; leaving you wondering if the home you remember is simply an elaborate story you dreamt up over the years. In grasping for the familiar, you find yourself questioning what you once took for granted and hoping to discover how exactly it all changed while you were gone.

Chris Haddix

Shaun Randol

Paul Berman reads at PEN World Voices Festival's opening night as Salman Rushdie and Judith Butler look on (© Beowulf Sheehan/PEN American Center)

[Read part one of this dispatch.]

Shaun Randol

Since the 1960s, Noam Chomsky has been a formidable critic of U.S. foreign policy; many (most?) of his ideas highly unwelcome in corporate media. Though the decades march on, his biting critique remains sharp, his political philosophy unwavering. In this interview, Chomsky discusses self-censorship and names the political crises intellectuals and activists should be acting on now. 

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