Roundtables

In The Mantle's sixth virtual roundtable, Managing Editor Corrie Hulse brings together three experts to discuss borders, their purpose, and who they serve. Roundtable participants delve into topics such as the shift to more solidified, violent borders post - 9/11, border identities, and the dichotomy of closed borders in a globalized society.

International Affairs Editor Corrie Hulse leads a discussion with three activists from around the world on the utility of protesting not with signs or banners in the streets, but with hashtags in the digital ether. The question at hand: What does hashtag activism mean for the future of global political movements? Roundtable participants go beyond the headlines to examine the efficacy and implications of tweeting for a cause.

In The Mantle's fourth virtual roundtable, artists and allies answer the question, "What is the role of the artist in a conflict zone?" The question is vexing, but becomes more interesting when one considers that "conflict" can take many forms. Revolution, war, ecological destruction, and the struggle to define the artist's role in society are the types of conflicts addressed in this fascinating discussion. Shaun Randol moderates.

In The Mantle's third virtual roundtable, four talented musicians from around the world tackle the deceptively simple question, "What is the role of the musician in a conflict zone?" Stretching over five countries on three continents and through conflict of various guises, the musicians in this discussion bring unique experiences—and passion—to the conversation. All agree, however, that in the face of adversity, the musician cannot sit idly by. Shaun Randol moderates. A soundtrack accompanies the discussion.

In The Mantle's second virtual roundtable, three acclaimed authors and poets from around the world ponder the weighty question, what is the role of the writer in a conflict zone? With intimate knowledge of the trauma and mental anguish so many writers face when laboring in the face of adversity, the participants vary in their approach to the question. Yet all three agree that the human experience never dulls the urge of a writer to engage the situation at hand, and to report on their role amidst hostilities. Shaun Randol moderates the discussion.

The United Nations' doctrine on the Responsibility to Protect (R2P) was adopted in 2005 at a UN world summit. Its purpose, to protect civilians from mass atrocities, is commendable. R2P calls on states to keep their populations safe, but what about in instances where states are functionally weak or non-existent? On whom does responsibility to protect vulnerable populations fall? In this inaugural virtual roundtable, Marie Mainil moderates a vibrant panel discussion between four emerging experts in this field who grapple with the complexities of this question, and the R2P doctrine as a whole.