Darfur

Corrie Hulse

What follows is the introduction to When We Let People Die: The Failure of the Responsibility to Protect, published by The Mantle in 2018. This collection of essays, by The Mantle's managing editor Corrie Hulse, examines the shortcomings in the implementation of the doctrine of the Responsibility to Protect, and what might be done to remedy international complacence in the face of mass atrocities. 

 

Corrie Hulse

In the midst of the referendum on independence in Sudan in early 2011, there was great concern that the situation would deteriorate into a full-blown civil war. Tensions were high, with outbreaks of violence in many of the border towns, such as Abyei. Calls were made stateside for the appointing of a high-level US diplomat for Darfur, as well as making genocide prevention a priority among the international community. After the vote on January 9, 2011, we saw the creation of the new state of South Sudan.

Corrie Hulse

On March 24, 2005 the United Nations established the UN Mission in Sudan (UNMIS) in order to oversee the Comprehensive Peace Agreement (CPA). The hope was for the CPA to bring an end to the civil war that had been raging for years. One of the stipulations of this agreement was the allowance of a secession vote for the south. This vote took place this past January and southern secession is set to be implemented on July 9, 2011.

Emily Cody

The secession of Southern Sudan following the referendum on self-determination is imminent. Despite the 2005 Comprehensive Peace Agreement (CPA) prescribing an interim period with a programme of legal reform to address long-standing grievances, no real, conscientious efforts were made to make unity realistic for southerners.

Corrie Hulse

Savo Heleta

With April elections drawing near, Sudan is on edge. Will the elections be fairly implemented and the results be just? Or will election fraud and violence throw the country into chaos? Savo Heleta takes a look at the final stages of the country's Comprehensive Peace Agreement and other events playing into the complex elections, and makes some bold and dire predictions.

Corrie Hulse

In spring 2005, the World Policy Journal was the first magazine to publish the photographs of former Marine Captain Brian Steidle. His undaunted efforts to bring global attention to the unfolding genocide in Darfur, Sudan, were then captured in The Devil Came on Horseback. Corrie Hulse reviews the moving documentary that pleads for the international community to take action in order to save the lives of those facing mass atrocities in war-torn Sudan. 

Erika Klein

After a mass government endorsed massacre on September 28 in Guinea, Africa, the West African Bloc has called for civilian rule, as the vice president assumed power over the country after a failed assassination attempt on President Moussa Dadis Camara last Thursday.

Sanctions & Investigations

Erika Klein

Most of us cannot fathom what it is like to live with violence or political strife. We are governed by laws, morals and democratic rights that afford us the protection we require during times of crisis and upheaval. Though our rape statistics in North America continue to go under-reported, rape as an act of war is heavily prevalent in many regions of the world, especially Africa.
 

Shaun Randol

Last night at the venerable 92Y, Council on Foreign Relations president Richard Haass took a few questions from a smiley, curious, leggy Katie Couric. Haass has a new book out, War of Necessity, War of Choice, and The MANTLE would love a good progressive critique of it--so get crackin'!