Guantanamo Bay

M.C. Armstrong

Murder at Camp Delta 
by Joseph Hickman
Simon & Schuster (2015), 256 pp

 

Marie Mainil

The majority of the prisoners remaining at Guantanamo Bay are from Yemen, a country with a rich history in alternative forms of justice-making. Restorative justice, a process similar to the reconciliation mechanisms used in Northern Ireland and South Africa, is appealing to many of Guantanamo's detainees. Could it be the key to closing the notorious prison? 

David Frakt

Author’s Note: I prepared these remarks for the “Going on the Record: Resistance and Writing” panel discussion at the PEN World Voices Festival of International Literature, but the format of the panel was changed, so I didn’t end up delivering them. The Mantle has kindly offered to publish my remarks as an essay. 

David Frakt

After presenting evidence that Mohammed Jawad had been abused by the U.S. while detained for six years at Guantanamo Bay, David Frakt argued that the abuse should result in dismissal of all charges against the young man. In support of this motion, Jawad was the first detainee to describe his torture at Guantanamo under oath in a military commission. In 2009, Jawad was repatriated to Afghanistan. Here Frakt explains how and why justice was served.

Shaun Randol

Erika Klein

The Supreme Court of Canada handed down its ruling Friday in the case of Omar Khadr, a Canadian child soldier who was captured by US forces in Afghanistan during a fire fight that left one US medical officer dead. Instead of being returned to Canadian authorities, Khadr, then only 15, was sent to Guantanamo Bay where he suffered interrogation and threats of torture.

Ed Hancox

As 2009 fades into history the urge for anyone with access to a media outlet is to compile some sort of year-end list. I am not going to put together a list of top stories or year end awards, but in the column below I am going to highlight seven stories that I think deserved more attention than they received, either because they challenged the conventional wisdom in international affairs, help to explain where our world is or where it may be heading, or, in the case of the science story at the end, because it is just too bizarre not to note.

Erika Klein

I had a sinking feeling in my stomach this week when the Canadian Federal Government and Prime Minister Harper's Conservatives voted to bury an inquiry into the abuse and transfer of Afghan detainees. It isn't the first time our military has been accused of a human rights scandal during peacekeeping missions and the move to postpone the inquiry suggests the government wants nothing more than to stop the flow of information and deflect any kind of responsibility.

Shaun Randol

On May 21 Big Media and the Internet went bananas over the dueling rhetoric of President Barack Obama and former Vice President Dick Cheney. Nevermind the nuances of their respective arguments on whether or not (or how) to close the prison at Guantanamo Bay and keep our country safe from terrorists, news and information outlets were more interested in the heavy weight fight theme than anything.