Human Rights

Corrie Hulse

What follows is the introduction to When We Let People Die: The Failure of the Responsibility to Protect, published by The Mantle in 2018. This collection of essays, by The Mantle's managing editor Corrie Hulse, examines the shortcomings in the implementation of the doctrine of the Responsibility to Protect, and what might be done to remedy international complacence in the face of mass atrocities. 


Richard Potter

Editor's Note: This is part one in our series on Pakistan's persecuted religious minorities. Click here to read part two, focused on the Ahmadi Muslim population.


Samuel AbadyOmar Fotihi
M.C. Armstrong

Murder at Camp Delta 
by Joseph Hickman
Simon & Schuster (2015), 256 pp


Corrie Hulse

Leila Seth


My name is Leila Seth. I am eighty-three years old. I have been in a long and happy marriage of more than sixty years with my husband Premo, and am the mother of three children. The eldest, Vikram, is a writer. The second, Shantum, is a Buddhist teacher. The third, Aradhana, is an artist and filmmaker. I love them all. My husband and I have brought them up with the values we were brought up with—honesty, courage, and sympathy for others. We know that they are hardworking and affectionate people who are trying to do some good in the world.

Marie Mainil

The majority of the prisoners remaining at Guantanamo Bay are from Yemen, a country with a rich history in alternative forms of justice-making. Restorative justice, a process similar to the reconciliation mechanisms used in Northern Ireland and South Africa, is appealing to many of Guantanamo's detainees. Could it be the key to closing the notorious prison? 

Corrie Hulse

After the 1994 genocide in Rwanda, in which hundreds of thousands of civilians were killed in just a few months while the international community stood by, the world cried "never again." A decade later, the principles of the Responsibility to Protect (R2P) were laid out. R2P today, however, remains only an idea. Corrie Hulse declares we must translate R2P principles into policy.

The Mantle

In the Fourteenth Century, the Roman Catholic theologian Nicholas Eymerich published Directorium Inquisitorum, a text that described many anti-religious and forbidden practices, like witchcraft, sorcery, and fortune telling.

David Frakt

Author’s Note: I prepared these remarks for the “Going on the Record: Resistance and Writing” panel discussion at the PEN World Voices Festival of International Literature, but the format of the panel was changed, so I didn’t end up delivering them. The Mantle has kindly offered to publish my remarks as an essay.