Iraq

M.C. Armstrong

The writer M.C. Armstrong was embedded with U.S. soldiers in Iraq when a military contractor divulged a secret about Saddam Hussein's weapons of mass destruction. Questions arose: Was he credible? Did U.S. authorities know about the buried armaments? Would the public even care? And what's a writer to do with the juicy information?

Anam Khan

The Refugees by Honore Daumier (1849-50)

Corrie Hulse

Pro-ISIL demontrators in Mosul on Monday June 16, 2014 (via)

Arie Amaya-Akkermans

[Symphony, ARTER, December 2012]

“To kill, like to die, is to seek an escape from being, to go where freedom and negation operate. Horror is the event of being which returns in the heart of this negation, as though nothing had happened.”–Emmanuel Levinas

World Policy Journal

by Rajkamal Kahlon

Patricia DeGennaro

On May 24, 2011, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu addressed the United States Congress. In his speech he declared that, “you [the US] don't need to send American troops to Israel. We defend ourselves.” Yet, in his more recent United Nations speech, he seemed to push the US to, yes, ironically protect Israel from a potentially nuclear Iran.

Patricia DeGennaro

It is way past the time to sit back and take a deep breath and rethink this reflexive rush to military solutions to foreign policy conundrums.

Ed Hancox

Former Bush Administration official Elliott Abrams has taken to the pages of Foreign Policy to offer a defense of the Neoconservative policies that were a hallmark of the Bush-era world view, and to link them with the ongoing Arab Spring movement (note: author/pundit Niall Ferguson was also pushing this argument on Sunday's episode of “Fareed Zakaria GPS”).  It is an odd defense on the part of Abram

Qasim Sabti

An actor. A sculptor. Singer. Painter. Musician. Poet. In this stirring collection of twelve vignettes, artist, collagist, and Secretary of the Iraqi Cultural Council, Qasim Sabti pays tribute to the men, women, and artwork ruthlessly murdered and destroyed in the chaos following the American invasion of Iraq.

Anthony Brent

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