Nelson Lowhim

Eric Anthamatten

Chancers: One Couple's Memoir
by Graham MacIndoe and Susan Stellin
Ballantine (2016), 448 pages

Chance. Luck. Choice. We take chances. We have luck. We make choices.

As a photographer, Graham MacIndoe chose—subjects, frames, aperture settings, negatives to be printed.

As a writer, Susan Stellin chose—subjects, sentences, adjectives, edits to be published.

They both took chances with their creations, their careers, and each other.

M.C. Armstrong

Murder at Camp Delta 
by Joseph Hickman
Simon & Schuster (2015), 256 pp


Laura Leigh Abby

In her first memoir, Smoke Gets in Your Eyes, Caitlin Doughty uses her own experience to examine why Americans oppose conversations about death. While the book may not help you figure out how to talk to your loved ones about death, the author will surely get you get you thinking about it. Laura Leigh Abby has this review.

Shaun Randol

In this essay, Shaun Randol wonders if, after forty years, John Berger's Marxist take on European oil painting and modern advertising is still relevant, and whether the feminist social critic Camille Paglia has lost her edge.

Soniah Kamal

Perhaps surprisingly, Qanta Ahmed’s religious and familial background does not adequately prepare her for a two-year stint as a doctor in Saudi Arabia. Thus, Ahmed’s memoir is less a fish-out-of-water story, and more like a fish-in-unfamiliar-water tale. Soniah Kamal reviews Ahmed’s mystified encounters of classicism, colorism, and sexism in The Kingdom.