Syria

Niki Singleton

"Drone Trouble" is a reaction to news in January 2014 of a possible U.S. bombing campaign to fight ISIS in the terrorist group's takeover of Fallujah. After two of the worst bombing campaigns in history in 2004, where the fallout from American use of white phosphorus has caused grave birth defects in infants and a four-fold rise in cancer among the civilian population, the anger around more U.S.

Marie Lamensch

On January 29, UNICEF released its most recent report detailing the plight of millions of children around the world. Afshan Khan, UNICEF director of emergency programs, spoke at the launch, making this point clear, “from deadly natural disasters to brutal conflicts and fast-spreading epidemics, children across the world are facing a new generation of humanitarian crises.”

Corrie Hulse

A woman weeps as she recounts the murder of her sons. (Still from E-Team)

 

As Anna spoke with the translator the woman went silent. Tears streamed down her face as she grasped a photo of the sons who were just executed outside her front door. She made eye contact with the camera, her eyes sunken and lost. Then she began to weep and speak to the room. “What’s the point of writing? What’s the point of talking? I swear, if we could save them, our tears would fill gallons. Our tears could fill gallons and form a river.”

Anam Khan

The Refugees by Honore Daumier (1849-50)

Marina Iordan

Damascus, Syria has been part of the bourgeoning Middle Eastern art scene since the early 2000’s, when works by Syrian artists began to spread throughout western galleries and institutions. Three years ago, they reached a peak. Then, the uprising against Syrian president Bashar al-Assad broke out. Its rapid, life-threatening evolution has led to the disappearance of many galleries and studios, annihilating rising talents.

Corrie Hulse

Arie Amaya-Akkermans

[Husain Tarabie]

Chris Haddix

How successful are images of armed conflict in communicating something of the experience of war? What kind of demand to these images place upon those untouched by the horrors of war? A recent exhibition, WAR/PHOTOGRAPHY, along with a new collection of World War I photographs published to commemorate the upcoming centennial, provide the opportunity to reflect on the continuing impact of war photographs. Chris Haddix has the review. 

Sahar Sarshar

The Mantle

We are anguished by the loss of life as a result of a war that has been raging for three years in Syria. Equally, we are dismayed by the insincerity and ineptitude of the “international community” to broker a political resolution to a tragic situation. In response to the chemical weapons attack of August 21st, which took the lives hundreds of Syrians, the people of the United States appear to have finally become aware of the conflict.

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