World Literature

Katharine Coldiron

The Witch Elm
by Tana French
Penguin Random House (2018), 528 pages

 

Aria Chiodo

Katharine Coldiron

The Strange Case of Dr. Couney: How a Mysterious European Showman Saved Thousands of American Babies
by Dawn Raffel
Blue Rider Press (2018), 304 pages

 

Matthew Turner

Matthew Turner is the author of Sweden, published by The Mantle in 2018.

Dami Ajayi

Kwame Dawes and Chris Abani are the editors of the New Generation African Poets Series (Akashic Books), an annual box set anthology of chapbooks by poets of African descent who have yet to publish a full-length collection. Established in 2014, this series, currently in its fifth year, has played an influential role in creating a publishing platform for new voices.

M.C. Armstrong

Zero K
by Don DeLillo
Simon & Schuster Trade (2017), 288 pages 

 

The Mantle

One should know better than to ask a group of editors for book suggestions. You'll never get just one book, but rather a never ending list of favorites, and must-reads, and want-to-reads, and so on. Nevertheless, we've bravely asked our small-but-mighty team to put together a summer reading list for you all. What follows are the books that currently sit on our nightstands--partially read, waiting to be read, and recently finished.

Enjoy!

 

 

Hilary Scheppers

Oxygen
by Julia Fiedorczuk
Translated from the Polish by Bill Johnston
Zephyr Press (2017), 134 pages Polish & English

 

Katherine Cintron

Editor's Note: Akpa Arinzechukwu is a Nigerian poet whose writing deals with the complicated intersection of sexuality, religion, and culture in Nigeria. He is currently living in Abia state, in the midst of the violence from the Biafran separatist movement. He recently sat down with Katherine Cintron, a student from Deltona High School, to talk about writing, music, and his project City Dwellers.

 

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Stanley Gazemba

The idea for Forbidden Fruit came to me in the expansive garden of an old colonial bungalow in Nairobi’s Lavington Estate, where I was then working as a gardener. Although the book was first published in Kenya in 2002 as The Stone Hills of Maragoli, it reverted to its working title when it was reissued by my American publisher, The Mantle, in 2017. We were in the middle of our Nairobi “winter,” around June or July. Back then the seasons were fairly regular and predictable, before the Global Warming monster came upon us.

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