World Literature

Stanley Gazemba

The idea for Forbidden Fruit came to me in the expansive garden of an old colonial bungalow in Nairobi’s Lavington Estate, where I was then working as a gardener. Although the book was first published in Kenya in 2002 as The Stone Hills of Maragoli, it reverted to its working title when it was reissued by my American publisher, The Mantle, in 2017. We were in the middle of our Nairobi “winter,” around June or July. Back then the seasons were fairly regular and predictable, before the Global Warming monster came upon us.

Chinenye Yvonne Ikwueme

Like a Mule Bringing Ice Cream to the Sun
by Sarah Ladipo Manyika
Cassava Republic Press (2016), 118 pages

 

Bridey Heing

There are moments in Stephen Moles’ The Most Wretched Thing Imaginable: Or Beneath the Burnt Umbrella where you can begin to see it coming together. A sequence of paragraphs begin to flow in a logical order that you can follow, or a name repeats enough times that it sticks in your mind, or a theme recurs in a way that suggests a plot. But those moments are few and far between, and most of the book is little more than nonsense.

Emmanuel IdumaShaun Randol

On Dec 1, The Mantle's editor in chief Shaun Randol and our author Emmanuel Iduma (The Sound of Things to Come) participated in a panel discussion at the Draper Program at NYU, along with Madhu Krishnan, assistant professor of 20th/ 21st-century p

Donald Molosi

The actor and playrwright Donald Molosi (Botswana) reads from his play Motswana: Africa, Dream Again. Motswana is the story of Botswana and its people as they transition from a British colony to an independent state. The play premiered off-Broadway in 2012 where it won an award at the United Solo Festival, the world’s largest solo theatre festival. Written, directed, and performed by Molosi, the play has been performed across the U.S. and is on tour in Botswana and South Africa.

Daimys E. Garcia

Emmanuel Iduma

While in university, the highlights of stories I wrote occurred to me during strolls. My parents lived on a university campus in Ile-Ife, at the edge of the staff quarters. It would take me twenty minutes to get to school from our house. I walked mostly at night. Done with the day’s work, and so fatigued I sometimes dozed on the road. I saw the value in being somnambulant, and the promise stupor held: the right name for a character on the tip of my tongue.

Nelson Lowhim

Vishwas R. Gaitonde

 

 

Shaun Randol

On August 28, The Mantle's founder, Shaun Randol, joined author Ayobami Adebayo (Nigeria) and writer Joel Ntwatwa (Uganda) to discuss Gambit: Newer African Writing (The Mantle) and African writing.

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