World Literature

Bridey Heing

Texas: The Great Theft
by Carmen Boullosa
Translated from the Spanish by Samantha Schnee
Deep Vellum Publishing (2015), 304 pages

 

Tim Fredrick

Writer's Notes is a series that invites writers to detail their projects at any stage in their process. Author Tim Fredrick discusses his short story collection We Regret to Inform You, and his approach to writing and collecting his own personal stories.

 

Ariell Cacciola

Satin Island
by Tom McCarthy
Knopf (2015) 208 pages

 

Geoffrey Robert Waring

A True Novel
by Minae Mizumura
Translated from the Japanese by Juliet Winters Carpenter
Other Press (2013 ), 880 pages

 

Phil Hanrahan

Writer’s Notes is a series that invites writers to detail their projects at any stage in their process. In this second installment by author Phil Hanrahan, he discusses his research trips and work on a book about the Burren College of Art in western Ireland’s singular Burren region. The book is currently titled Moonlight in County Clare. You can read Phil’s first installment here.

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Ariell Cacciola

This article is part of The Mantle's series Against Censorship.

 

An Iranian Metamorphosis 
by Mana Neyestani
Translated from the Persian by Ghazal Mosadeq
Uncivilized Books (2014), 208 pp

Ariell Cacciola

The Rabbit Back Literature Society 
by Pasi Ilmari Jääskeläinen
Translated from the Finnish by Lola M. Rogers
Thomas Dunne Books (2015), 352 pp

 

Laura Leigh Abby

In her first memoir, Smoke Gets in Your Eyes, Caitlin Doughty uses her own experience to examine why Americans oppose conversations about death. While the book may not help you figure out how to talk to your loved ones about death, the author will surely get you get you thinking about it. Laura Leigh Abby has this review.

Ariell Cacciola

The past several months I have been traveling in Central Europe, just enough away from the United States to feel slightly out of the proverbial loop. Back stateside, I am usually found beneath a stack of novels consisting of copies in need of review or for mere pleasure (although, usually the former), all the while trying to fit in my own angst-ridden fiction.

M.C. Armstrong

The writer M.C. Armstrong was embedded with U.S. soldiers in Iraq when a military contractor divulged a secret about Saddam Hussein's weapons of mass destruction. Questions arose: Was he credible? Did U.S. authorities know about the buried armaments? Would the public even care? And what's a writer to do with the juicy information?

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